Too Risky to Exchange?

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The stories you need to read before enrolling in the ObamaCare Insurance Exchange

OVERVIEW

ObamaCare is here.

It has been more than three years since the president signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. On October 1, 2013, key provisions will take effect; among those provisions are the ObamaCare insurance exchanges.

The ObamaCare exchanges are built around a complicated tax credit scheme that subsidizes a portion of enrollees’ annual premiums. Unlike other tax credits that are typically sent directly to the taxpayer, the ObamaCare exchange tax credits are sent by the government to enrollees’ exchange insurance plans.

Like so many government-run programs, the ObamaCare exchanges are intrusive and complex. Worse, they are designed in such a way that any small change in an enrollee’s life circumstances can have a major impact on his or her premiums, deductibles or access to care, and could even result in an audit from the IRS.

This report is largely written in narrative form. It features five brief scenarios that each demonstrate why Americans should be wary of enrolling in the ObamaCare exchange based on the risks to their wallets and to their health. The characters in these stories are not real. Rather, they are based on typical Americans—a single mom, newlyweds, an expecting husband and wife. They are not extraordinary and their challenges and opportunities are not unusual. They represent the everyday American man or woman. But while the characters themselves are fictional, their experiences with the ObamaCare exchanges are frighteningly real.

We all know a Tom, a Jill, a Kara or a Ned. Maybe Ned is you…

These stories are based entirely on factual data obtained from various government, tax and health sources. Every source used to develop our characters’ experiences is cited.

If the federal government succeeds in convincing Americans to enroll in the ObamaCare exchanges, these stories— and dozens more like them—will be repeated millions of times over throughout the country.

After reading this report, ask yourself this simple question:

Is enrolling in the ObamaCare exchange worth the risk?