In The News

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Only in government does modestly slowing spending growth mean severe “cuts.” Opponents of the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) proposal to change ObamaCare falsely claim that it will result in massive spending cuts, especially in Medicaid. That simply is not true. The bill does not spend fewer dollars. In fact, under this bill, taxpayers will spend more over the next 10 years than they are...[ read more ]

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The Senate Finance Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing on the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill on Monday. Over the last week, it has been Groundhog Day again in the health care debate as some ACA supporting groups pump out misleading or false reports on the impact of the current GCHJ bill. While there is plenty to debate, criticize and ask...[ read more ]

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Ohio lawmakers are setting an example for the rest of the nation by enacting Medicaid work requirements, which will move thousands of Ohioans out of dependency and usher them back into the workforce. And sadly, ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion underscores the need for this important, common sense reform. ObamaCare expansion has unleashed an enrollment explosion in Ohio and elsewhere. When Gov....[ read more ]

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For those who can least afford them, licensing fees are a substantial burden that should be eliminated. Occupational licensing, the requirement that people get a government permission slip to work, hurts millions of Americans in their efforts to make a living and support themselves. But licensing laws disproportionately harm two groups in particular: those trapped in poverty and military families....[ read more ]

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Work requirements are a critical part of welfare. Without them in place, welfare can quickly become a way of life instead of a temporary safety net. Unfortunately, states have used numerous workarounds to void work requirements in food stamps, perpetuating dependency and leaving taxpayers on the hook. One such workaround is blanket waivers. States can get permission from the federal...[ read more ]

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What happens when able-bodied adults face work requirements in order to receive food stamps? They leave the program in record numbers, going back to work in hundreds of different industries and more than doubling their incomes. Better still, their higher income more than offsets the benefits they lose. And individuals who stay in the program increase their employment, earn higher wages,...[ read more ]

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There is growing realization in Washington, D.C. and state capitol buildings that today’s level of occupational licensing has grown too large in both scope and scale. About three in every ten Americans need a license—or government permission slip—to earn a living. This is substantially higher than the 5% of workers who needed a license in the 1950s. Now everyone from locksmiths and interior designers, to...[ read more ]

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Momentum for occupational licensing reform continues to grow on the state level and in Washington, D.C. Though there have been many meaningful reforms in states like Mississippi and Arizona, Tennessee is the clear leader in the nationwide push to reform out-of-control licensing laws. Forward-thinking Tennessee state policymakers not only reformed state licensing — they also addressed licensing on the local level. Tennessee passed The Freedom...[ read more ]

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States have tried it, and it works. Congress should apply the lesson at the federal level. President Trump’s recently released budget should start a long overdue conversation about the next round of welfare reform in America. The new budget rightfully prioritizes work requirements. They protect resources for the truly needy and unlock economic opportunity for those trapped in entitlement programs....[ read more ]

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While speaking to state policymakers in Colorado this month, Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta challenged them to reform their states’ outrageous occupational licensing laws. Occupational licensing requires people to gain government’s permission to work, and this erects expensive and time-consuming barriers to earning a living. Acosta cited occupational licensing’s limits on economic opportunity, job mobility, and the adoption of new technology as...[ read more ]